Idiots File Class Action Suit Against Apple Because Kids Are Kids

So you’ve found out your kids have charged some money to your credit card because they bought some add-on to that iOS game they’re always playing.

You should:

(A) Take the device away.

(B) Change your password and don’t tell it to them so they are unable to make more in-app purchases.

(C) Tell them to ask you before purchasing anything.

(D) Sue Apple.

The correct answer is anything but (D).

I know that we’ve all read plenty of things on the internet stating that parents today are disgusting, lazy, misguided, intolerable, selfish morons, but hear me out, Apple is being sued by a bunch of them!

So this lawsuit alleges that Apple was able to “pocket millions of dollars” because of some shady transaction methods and bait-and-switch schemes that lure kids in to making purchases they don’t truly understand. Granted, children may have no idea what they’re doing when it comes to online purchasing. So, Apple addressed the issue by requiring a password to make any “real money” purchases within apps. But Garen Meguerian, of Phoenixville Pennsylvania says it’s not enough… Of course he does.

Meguerian, along with the other parents listed in the suit are tired of Apple’s super shady evil business practices. He claims that games like Zombie Cafe, Bakery Story, Tap Zoo, Tap Fish, Glass Tower, Sundae Maker, and Cake Maker are very misleading when it comes to in-app purchasing and that Apple is using that sneakiness to line their big corporate fat-cat pockets; along with some other evil corporate raping and pillaging.

Well, first of all, in case you were unaware Mr. Meguerian, Apple doesn’t make these apps. Yes, Apple approves them, but these “shady business practices” you speak of are not on Apple’s no-no list when it comes to app approval. Sure, they may be a bit sketchy, but let’s get mad at the appropriate source here. Second, Apple addressed this issue when they required users to enter their passwords for real world purchases on iOS devices. So, let’s draw a line in the sand here and have it represent the age of 10 years old.

Parents, if you have child who is younger than ten, then they’re probably a bit fuzzy about the concept of real world money, especially in terms of online purchasing. So the best solution here is to keep your iTunes account password safe from them, as they will likely use it whenever they wish without truly grasping what they’re doing. Have them come to you with any purchases they would like to make and you can use your adult-sized brain to figure out how much it will actually cost you.

Now, if your child is above the age of 10, then they’re probably a bit more mature and more familiar with the concept money. If you choose to share your password with them, have them come to you with any purchases they would like to make and you can use your adult-sized brain to figure out how much it will actually cost you.

Are we clear on this?

All I’m really trying to say is: Be a parent and have your children come to you with any purchases they would like to make and you can use your adult-sized brain to figure out how much it will actually cost you.

Ok thanks.



Source : Apple Insider

7 thoughts on “Idiots File Class Action Suit Against Apple Because Kids Are Kids

    1. I do agree. I got my first cell phone in high school, and there was no such thing as a “smartphone” in those days. Kids should be weened in to technology.

      1. I got my first cell phone in college. There were smartphones but I was still dumped on a dumb phone. Though I guess the true age of the smartphone didn’t begin until the iPhone and that was toward the end for me.

    2. I do think that’s a little harsh. There are plenty of iOS and Android games geared toward small children. If they’re using it as a handheld gaming device it’s no different than when children played Gameboy, etc from a gaming perspective. The fact that they can also purchase things obviously is a problem but that is what the password and the general message in the article aim to control.

  1. The main problem, which I do kind of agree with, if that iTunes will keep you logged in for something like 5-15 minutes (I forget the exact number) after you input your password as a convenience. So the parents would install an app for the kid, hand the device over, and the kid still had a window to make purchases. I do believe they changed that in one of the latest firmware updates though.

  2. “Apple addressed the issue by requiring a password to make any “real money” purchases within apps.”

    No, they didn’t really address the problem.  There is still a time window after password input in which additional purchases can be made without putting in the password again.  It will ask you one time about purchasing something for say 99 cents, and you might think “ok 99 cents for a special treat.”  I learned the hard way that the DEFAULT is that you don’t have to put in your password again for some time period  but your tot can then purchase something additional for $99.  Many games have virtual fake money (in fact in this game the player earns virtual fake money, not points), so the child probably won’t even realize they are spending your money.

    I am not an irresponsible person.  My phone is password locked, and my 8 year old does not know how to unlock my phone and certainly doesn’t know my itunes password.  She never uses it without me sitting there in the same room, and I can hear the music from the game.  Yes, I knew that the game had in-app puchases, but my assumption was that I would have to put in a password to authorize every purchase.  THAT IS NOT THE CASE.  She sat right next to me and rang up the bill to over $100 in 10 minutes playing a game that no one over the age of 10 would be able to tolerate playing for 45 seconds.

    Needless to say, I am not very happy about this situation.  If itunes doesn’t refund this money, I will join the class action lawsuit.

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